Summer Course: Research Methods in Ocean Acidification 2018

Friday Harbor Laboratories, University of Washington

A summer course will be offered on "research methods in ocean acidification", July 16-August 17, 2018. The course will introduce students to key theory, methods, and techniques in ocean acidification research. Through a mixture of hands-on lab experience, field observations, and small-group workshops and lectures the course aims to provide students with the relevant knowledge and skills to perform ocean acidification research at their home institutions, and in other settings.

The course will be taught by Drs. Jon Havenhand (Dept. of Marine Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Sweden), Andrew Dickson (Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC San Diego), and Terrie Klinger (School of Marine & Environmental Affairs, University of Washington)

For a description of the course and how to apply click [EasyDNNnewsLink|88]

Tuesday, January 30, 2018
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Researching the Impact of Ocean Acidification on Atlantic Silversides

Researching the Impact of Ocean Acidification on Atlantic Silversides

Northeast Fisheries Science Center

Scientists and NOAA Hollings scholars at the Northeast Fisheries Science Center (NEFSC) are studying how Atlantic silverside, one of the most common fishes on the Atlantic Coast and an important diet component of many larger fishes of this region, are impacted by changes in ocean acidification (increased CO2, lower pH), increased temperature, and lower dissolved oxygen projected to occur in the future. The team is exposing silverside embryos and larvae to these three stressors and monitoring effects on survival, hatching time, and size of the fish larvae at hatching and later in life. In addition, they are mimicking day-night cycles in CO2 by oscillating the CO2 levels every 12 hours and assessing how the magnitude of these fluctuations impact young silverside. This will help scientists better predict how future ocean conditions could alter this important food source.

Pictures: 1. 2017 Hollings Scholar Amy Zyck monitoring young Atlantic silverside in the CO2 and dissolved oxygen experiment at the NOAA Sandy Hook Laboratory.


Wednesday, January 24, 2018

Funding Opportunity Through California Ocean Protection Council's Proposition 84 Competitive Grant Program

University of Southern California Sea Grant Program, California Sea Grant Program, and California Ocean Protection Council

This announcement invites the submission of brief, preliminary proposals from Principal Investigators (PI) at eligible organizations who wish to pursue research relating to the priority research topic areas identified below. Eligible proposing institutions are welcome to propose research lasting up to three years in duration, and requesting a total budget from $80,000 to $250,000 (sum of total direct costs plus 25% indirect costs). Applicants must submit a pre-proposal by March 15, 2018, to one of the Sea Grant programs, depending on the focus area and priority research topic(s) that the proposed research addresses. For more information visit the [EasyDNNnewsLink|86]

California Ocean Protection Council has identified six broad focus areas that include all the priority research topic areas identified in this call.  They are:

  1. Ocean acidification and hypoxia, and other changes in ocean conditions from a changing climate

  2. Sustainable fisheries and aquaculture

  3. Sea-level rise adaptation and coastal resilience

  4. Coastal sediment management

  5. Marine pollution

  6. Marine renewable energy 

Thursday, January 11, 2018
Categories: Federal Funding
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Student Internship: Analysis of Ocean Acidification and Co-stressor Effects on Fish Early Life Processes

NOAA Fisheries Service Northeast Fisheries Science Center

This project evaluates the potential effects of ocean acidification and other environmental co-stressors on fish populations. The effects on fish of an increased level of ocean acidification –another consequence of C02 emissions – are largely unknown and represent a new and exciting research front. We are using a combination of field, laboratory, and experimental data to address this topic with respect to resource fish species of the northeastern USA. The student will be directly involved in laboratory experiments that address components of this larger research effort. Among other activities in 2018, we will be conducting experiments on the direct and interactive effects of C02 (acidity), dissolved oxygen (DO), and thermal regimes on embryos and larvae of fish, and assessing the adaptive potential of the fish species to these stressors. For more information visit [EasyDNNnewsLink|85]

This opportunity is for NOAA's College-Funded Internship Program. NOAA partners with selected colleges to provide undergraduate students summer internship experience in science, policy, and science communication. You must be enrolled at a partner school to participate and apply through that school. To find out more information visit [EasyDNNnewsLink|84]
Thursday, January 11, 2018
Categories: Job Postings
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Ocean Acidification means major changes for California mussels

Ocean Acidification means major changes for California mussels

Florida State University News

For thousands of years, California mussel shells have shared a relatively uniform mineralogical makeup — long, cylindrical calcite crystals ordered in neat vertical rows with crisp, geometric regularity. But in a study published this week in the journal [EasyDNNnewsLink|82], McCoy and her team suggest that escalating rates of ocean acidification are shaking up that shell mineralogy on its most basic structural levels. “What we’ve seen in more recent shells is that the crystals are small and disoriented,” said Assistant Professor of Biological Science Sophie McCoy, who led the study. “These are significant changes in how these animals produce their shells that can be tied to a shifting ocean chemistry.” “When the mussels are ready to build their shells, they first lay down an amorphous soup of calcium carbonate, which they later order and organize,” McCoy said. “More recent shells have just started heaping that calcium carbonate soup where it needs to go and then leaving it there disordered.” The team also found that recent shells exhibited elevated levels of magnesium — a sign that the process of shell formation has been disrupted.

Find the full article [EasyDNNnewsLink|83]

Photo: Sophie McCoy.

Monday, January 8, 2018
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