Ocean Acidification: Building a Path Toward Adaptation in the Arctic

Ocean Acidification: Building a Path Toward Adaptation in the Arctic

NOAA Ocean Acidification Program

Scientists, economists, and stakeholders from all eight Arctic countries forge a path forward in adapting to ocean acidification in the Arctic

Arctic waters are rapidly changing. In the coming decades, these high-latitude waters will undergo significant shifts that could affect fish, shellfish, marine mammals, along with the livelihoods and well-being of communities dependent on these resources.

Wednesday, February 8, 2017
New Tool Helps Oyster Growers Prepare for Changing Ocean Chemistry

New Tool Helps Oyster Growers Prepare for Changing Ocean Chemistry

NOAA Research, Laura Newcomb

For Bill Mook, coastal acidification is one thing his oyster hatchery cannot afford to ignore. Mook Sea Farm depends on seawater from the Gulf of Maine pumped into a Quonset hut-style building where tiny oysters are grown in tanks. Mook sells these tiny oysters to other oyster farmers or transfers them to his oyster farm on the Damariscotta River where they grow large enough to sell to restaurants and markets on the East Coast.

Thursday, January 26, 2017

Improving Ocean Research and Mapping

The White House

Summary: Federal reports advance knowledge and describe actions to address ocean acidification and ocean and coastal mapping.

Two reports released today respond to the 2014 Strategic Plan for Federal Research and Monitoring of Ocean Acidification, which was prepared pursuant to the Federal Ocean Acidification Research and Monitoring Act of 2009 (FOARAM). The “Implementation of the Strategic Plan for Federal Research and Monitoring of Ocean Acidification” report identifies the needs and activities described in the Strategic Plan that are being addressed by Federal agencies. These efforts will enable agencies to better identify and address gaps in research and information on ocean acidification. To complement the Implementation Plan, the “Fourth Report on Federally Funded Ocean Acidification Research and Monitoring Activities” responds to a Congressional request for biennial updates on implementation activities under FOARAM, identifies expenditures for these activities, and details how Federal agencies are implementing the Strategic Plan in a coordinated and complimentary manner.

Wednesday, December 21, 2016
Categories: OA News
NOAA research links human-caused CO2 emissions to dissolving sea snail shells off U.S. West Coast

NOAA research links human-caused CO2 emissions to dissolving sea snail shells off U.S. West Coast

NOAA

For the first time, NOAA and partner scientists have connected the concentration of human-caused carbon dioxide in waters off the U.S. Pacific coast to the dissolving of shells of microscopic marine sea snails called pteropods.

“This is the first time we’ve been able to tease out the percentage of human-caused carbon dioxide from natural carbon dioxide along a large portion of the West Coast and link it directly to pteropod shell dissolution,” said Richard Feely, a NOAA senior scientist who led the research appearing in Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science. “Our research shows that humans are increasing the acidification of U.S. West Coast coastal waters, making it more difficult for marine species to build strong shells.”

Wednesday, November 23, 2016

New tool helps oyster growers prepare for changing ocean chemistry

NOAA Research

For Bill Mook, coastal acidification is one thing his oyster hatchery cannot afford to ignore.

Mook Sea Farm depends on seawater from the Gulf of Maine pumped into a Quonset hut-style building where tiny oysters are grown in tanks. Mook sells these tiny oysters to other oyster farmers or transfers them to his oyster farm on the Damariscotta River where they grow large enough to sell to restaurants and markets on the East Coast.

Tuesday, September 6, 2016
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