From space to the sea floor: a deeper look at ocean acidification along the East Coast

From space to the sea floor: a deeper look at ocean acidification along the East Coast

NOAA OCEAN ACIDIFICATION PROGRAM

What if satellites circling our blue planet from space could offer insight into how an invisible gas like carbon dioxide moves through coastal waters, hundreds of miles above the ocean’s surface? Scientists will be working to make this a reality as they travel from Nova Scotia to Florida on board NOAA ship Henry B. Bigelow to understand what is driving changes in our ocean’s chemistry.
Tuesday, June 26, 2018
Tags:
The spirit of collaboration aboard Gulf of Mexico cruise

The spirit of collaboration aboard Gulf of Mexico cruise

NOAA Research &Ocean Acidification Program

This summer, NOAA and partner scientists will conduct their most collaborative ocean acidification sampling of the Gulf of Mexico yet. Set to depart today, July 18th, the Gulf of Mexico Ecosystems and Carbon Cruise (GOMECC-3) will travel through international waters with 24 scientists from the United States, Mexico and Cuba on board.
Tuesday, July 18, 2017
Ocean Acidification: Building a Path Toward Adaptation in the Arctic

Ocean Acidification: Building a Path Toward Adaptation in the Arctic

NOAA Ocean Acidification Program

Scientists, economists, and stakeholders from all eight Arctic countries forge a path forward in adapting to ocean acidification in the Arctic

Arctic waters are rapidly changing. In the coming decades, these high-latitude waters will undergo significant shifts that could affect fish, shellfish, marine mammals, along with the livelihoods and well-being of communities dependent on these resources.

Wednesday, February 8, 2017
New Tool Helps Oyster Growers Prepare for Changing Ocean Chemistry

New Tool Helps Oyster Growers Prepare for Changing Ocean Chemistry

NOAA Research, Laura Newcomb

For Bill Mook, coastal acidification is one thing his oyster hatchery cannot afford to ignore. Mook Sea Farm depends on seawater from the Gulf of Maine pumped into a Quonset hut-style building where tiny oysters are grown in tanks. Mook sells these tiny oysters to other oyster farmers or transfers them to his oyster farm on the Damariscotta River where they grow large enough to sell to restaurants and markets on the East Coast.

Thursday, January 26, 2017

New tool helps oyster growers prepare for changing ocean chemistry

NOAA Research

For Bill Mook, coastal acidification is one thing his oyster hatchery cannot afford to ignore.

Mook Sea Farm depends on seawater from the Gulf of Maine pumped into a Quonset hut-style building where tiny oysters are grown in tanks. Mook sells these tiny oysters to other oyster farmers or transfers them to his oyster farm on the Damariscotta River where they grow large enough to sell to restaurants and markets on the East Coast.

Tuesday, September 6, 2016
RSS
12