OAP Deputy Director contributes to effort to identify research need to understand impacts and explore adaptation in Arctic

April 28th, 2018

OAR OAP Deputy Director participated in the AMAP/EU-PolarNet Stakeholder Workshop on Research Needs on Climate-Related Effects on the Arctic Cryosphere and Adaptation Options. Participants discussed research issues in relation to both the need for further scientific understanding of the impacts of the rapidly changing climate on the Arctic cryosphere and the need for investigation of options for adaptation to these changes by Arctic communities and residents.
Monday, April 30, 2018
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OAP Serves on Panel to Strengthen Collaborative Ocean Acidification Research in the Arctic

August 29th, 2017

Max Kaplan, a Knauss Fellow with the OAP,  will be serving on a panel at the Arctic Science Networking Workshop hosted by the Arctic Council to be held in Helsinki, Finland. He will be speaking to opportunities to strengthen international collaborations in ocean acidification monitoring in the Arctic, a region that is particularly vulnerable to changes in ocean chemistry
Sunday, August 27, 2017
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Research shows ocean acidification is spreading rapidly in the Arctic

Research shows ocean acidification is spreading rapidly in the Arctic

NOAA Oceanic and Atmospheric Research

Ocean acidification is spreading rapidly in the western Arctic Ocean in both area and depth, potentially affecting shellfish, other marine species in the food web, and communities that depend on these resources, according to new research published in Nature Climate Change by NOAA, Chinese marine scientists and other partners.

Tuesday, March 14, 2017
Ocean Acidification: Building a Path Toward Adaptation in the Arctic

Ocean Acidification: Building a Path Toward Adaptation in the Arctic

NOAA Ocean Acidification Program

Scientists, economists, and stakeholders from all eight Arctic countries forge a path forward in adapting to ocean acidification in the Arctic

Arctic waters are rapidly changing. In the coming decades, these high-latitude waters will undergo significant shifts that could affect fish, shellfish, marine mammals, along with the livelihoods and well-being of communities dependent on these resources.

Wednesday, February 8, 2017
The Point of No Return: Climate Change Nightmares Are Already Here

The Point of No Return: Climate Change Nightmares Are Already Here

Rolling Stone

The impacts of ocean acidification on marine species may be occurring earlier than expected. Scientists from the NOAA Northwest Fisheries Science Center (NWFSC), Bill Peterson​, and NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (PMEL), Dr. Simone Alin and Dr. Nina Bednarsek,​ are featured in an article by The Rolling Stone discussing the imminent threat of ocean acidification on marine species in the most vulnerable regions around the globe, such as the Pacific Northwest.

Wednesday, August 5, 2015
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