How can education help mitigate ocean acidification?

How can education help mitigate ocean acidification?

NOAA National Marine Sanctuaries

This May, Hobart, Tasmania will attract more than 350 scientists to an international symposium about our changing climate and ocean, particularly focusing on ocean acidification. Together, NOAA's Office of National Marine Sanctuaries and Ocean Acidification Program have organized a special outreach session and evening Share-a-Thon to help educators, communicators, and scientists share effective approaches to communicating ocean acidification.
Thursday, April 28, 2016
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NOAA Ocean Acidification Program Sets Course for Next Three Years

NOAA Ocean Acidification Program Sets Course for Next Three Years

NOAA Ocean Acidification Program

These are exciting times for the NOAA Ocean Acidification Program (OAP) – the Program is growing and maturing! The OAP is the only federal program dedicated to ocean acidification, and was founded just four years ago.  It is committed to promoting integration across NOAA to achieve an interdisciplinary approach and fulfill requirements outlined by the FOARAM Act  (Federal Ocean Acidification Research and Monitoring Act) and the  Interagency Working Group on Ocean Acidification Strategic Plan for Federal Research and Monitoring Requirements of Ocean Acidification. At the start of FY15, the OAP moved into its second, three-year funding cycle.  

Thursday, March 31, 2016
NOAA awards will help improve projections of acidification impacts in changing coastal waters

NOAA awards will help improve projections of acidification impacts in changing coastal waters

NOAA Ocean Acidification Program

Awards of $1.3 million this year, totaling $4.1 million over three years, will focus on understanding the combined effects of ocean acidification, low oxygen and nutrient pollution on economically and ecologically important species in coastal habitats.

It is clear that our ocean is becoming more acidic as a result of carbon dioxide seeping into open ocean surface waters. But closer to shore things become a bit murky, as other factors can also change the chemistry of coastal waters. In these waters which are home to many important marine organisms on which coastal communities rely, scientists will be working to shed light on the potential impacts of acidification and other stresses.

Monday, January 4, 2016
Acid trip: Great Lakes could face similar acidification risk as the seas

Acid trip: Great Lakes could face similar acidification risk as the seas

Brian Bienkowski (The Daily Climate)

As in the oceans, carbon dioxide from the atmosphere could throw off water chemistry in large freshwater bodies like the Great Lakes, putting the food web at risk. But the science remains unsettled and, according to researchers, must be bolstered if we are to understand what increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide means for freshwater.
Wednesday, December 16, 2015
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Our Deadened, Carbon-Soaked Seas

Our Deadened, Carbon-Soaked Seas

Richard W. Spinrad and Ian Boyd

Ocean and coastal waters around the world are beginning to tell a disturbing story. The seas, like a sponge, are absorbing increasing amounts of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, so much so that the chemical balance of our oceans and coastal waters is changing and a growing threat to marine ecosystems. Over the past 200 years, the world’s seas have absorbed more than 150 billion metric tons of carbon from human activities. Currently, that’s a worldwide average of 15 pounds per person a week, enough to fill a coal train long enough to encircle the equator 13 times every year.
Thursday, October 15, 2015
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