Funding Opportunity Through California Ocean Protection Council's Proposition 84 Competitive Grant Program

University of Southern California Sea Grant Program, California Sea Grant Program, and California Ocean Protection Council

This announcement invites the submission of brief, preliminary proposals from Principal Investigators (PI) at eligible organizations who wish to pursue research relating to the priority research topic areas identified below. Eligible proposing institutions are welcome to propose research lasting up to three years in duration, and requesting a total budget from $80,000 to $250,000 (sum of total direct costs plus 25% indirect costs). Applicants must submit a pre-proposal by March 15, 2018, to one of the Sea Grant programs, depending on the focus area and priority research topic(s) that the proposed research addresses. For more information visit the USC Sea Grant Website

California Ocean Protection Council has identified six broad focus areas that include all the priority research topic areas identified in this call.  They are:

  1. Ocean acidification and hypoxia, and other changes in ocean conditions from a changing climate

  2. Sustainable fisheries and aquaculture

  3. Sea-level rise adaptation and coastal resilience

  4. Coastal sediment management

  5. Marine pollution

  6. Marine renewable energy 

Thursday, January 11, 2018
Categories: Federal Funding
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Student Internship: Analysis of Ocean Acidification and Co-stressor Effects on Fish Early Life Processes

NOAA Fisheries Service Northeast Fisheries Science Center

This project evaluates the potential effects of ocean acidification and other environmental co-stressors on fish populations. The effects on fish of an increased level of ocean acidification –another consequence of C02 emissions – are largely unknown and represent a new and exciting research front. We are using a combination of field, laboratory, and experimental data to address this topic with respect to resource fish species of the northeastern USA. The student will be directly involved in laboratory experiments that address components of this larger research effort. Among other activities in 2018, we will be conducting experiments on the direct and interactive effects of C02 (acidity), dissolved oxygen (DO), and thermal regimes on embryos and larvae of fish, and assessing the adaptive potential of the fish species to these stressors. For more information visit NCCOS Website

This opportunity is for NOAA's College-Funded Internship Program. NOAA partners with selected colleges to provide undergraduate students summer internship experience in science, policy, and science communication. You must be enrolled at a partner school to participate and apply through that school. To find out more information visit NOAA Internships
Thursday, January 11, 2018
Categories: Job Postings
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Ocean Acidification means major changes for California mussels

Ocean Acidification means major changes for California mussels

Florida State University News

For thousands of years, California mussel shells have shared a relatively uniform mineralogical makeup — long, cylindrical calcite crystals ordered in neat vertical rows with crisp, geometric regularity. But in a study published this week in the journal Global Change BiologyMcCoy and her team suggest that escalating rates of ocean acidification are shaking up that shell mineralogy on its most basic structural levels. “What we’ve seen in more recent shells is that the crystals are small and disoriented,” said Assistant Professor of Biological Science Sophie McCoy, who led the study. “These are significant changes in how these animals produce their shells that can be tied to a shifting ocean chemistry.” “When the mussels are ready to build their shells, they first lay down an amorphous soup of calcium carbonate, which they later order and organize,” McCoy said. “More recent shells have just started heaping that calcium carbonate soup where it needs to go and then leaving it there disordered.” The team also found that recent shells exhibited elevated levels of magnesium — a sign that the process of shell formation has been disrupted.

Find the full article here

Photo: Sophie McCoy.

Monday, January 8, 2018

Post-Doctoral/Senior Researcher in Carbonate Chemistry of the New York Bight

Stony Brook University, School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences

Applications for a Postdoctoral Researcher (PR) are invited to work with an interdisciplinary team of biological and physical oceanographers at Stony Brook University, School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences in Stony Brook, NY. The PR will work on a project funded by the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation to develop indicators to monitor the health of the New York Bight ecosystem.  The PR will be responsible for collecting and analyzing data on carbonate chemistry in the New York Bight. To apply please visit here and follow the postdoctoral link. Please note requisitions 1703371 and 1703364 are for one vacancy. The title/rank (Postdoctoral/Senior Researcher) will be contingent upon the selected candidate's skills and experience in their area of expertise.  Apply for one or both depending on your qualifications.  Please contact Janet Nye (janet.nye@stonybrook.edu) for further information.

Monday, January 8, 2018
Categories: Job Postings
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Low pH in Coastal Waters of the Gulf of Maine: A Data Synthesis-Driven Investigation of Probable Sources, Patterns and Processes Involved

David W. Townsend, University of Maine

Coastal Maine supports valuable lobster, clam, oyster and other shellfish industries that comprise >90% of Maine’s record $616M landed value last year. Earlier monitoring efforts in Maine and New Hampshire have documented periods of unusually acidic conditions in subsurface waters of Maine’s estuaries, which may be driven by episodic influxes of waters from the Gulf’s nutrient-rich, highly productive coastal current system. Sources of acidity to the estuaries also include the atmosphere, freshwater fluxes, and local eutrophication processes, all modulated by variability imparted by a number of processes.This project is a data synthesis effort to look at long-term trends in water quality data to identify the key drivers of acidification in this area. Extensive data sets dating back to the 1980s (including carbonate system, hydrography, oxygen, nutrients, and other environmental variables) will be assembled, subjected to QA/QC, and analyzed to assess acidification events in the context of landward, seaward and direct atmospheric sources, as may be related to processes operating on tidal to decadal timescales. Such analyses are requisite for any future vulnerability assessments of fishery-dependent communities in Maine and New Hampshire to the effects of coastal acidification.

Friday, December 22, 2017
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