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education & outreach

Announcing Mid-Atlantic Ocean, Coastal, and Estuarine Acidification Graduate Research Fellowship Recipients

NOAA Ocean Acidification Program and the National Sea Grant College Program are pleased to announce the 2018 recipients of a new Mid-Atlantic Graduate Research Fellowship in Ocean, Coastal, and Estuarine Acidification. Six fellowships were awarded through a competitive selection process to provide Masters and Doctoral students two years of funding during the 2018 and 2019 academic years through the Mid-Atlantic Sea Grant Consortium.

Announcing Mid-Atlantic Ocean, Coastal, and Estuarine Acidification Graduate Research Fellowship Recipients Read More »

NEW online community catalyzing response to #oceanacidification through collaboration and information sharing

 A virtual space to:
Engage with regional and topical teams
Address challenges with others in your field
Share resources and information on ocean acidification
Facilitate interdisciplinary collaboration
Follow the latest conferences, workshop, and webinars

NEW online community catalyzing response to #oceanacidification through collaboration and information sharing Read More »

Why I put a pteropod in a CT scanner to study the impacts of ocean acidification

During this webinar Rosie Oakes of the National Academy of Sciences of Drexel University discussed how she used a micro CT scanner to image pteropods in 3D to measure their shell thickness and volume. She will explain how she enlarges these 3D reconstructions to print them for educational purposes, and how you can do the same. Finally, she'll share her new research direction, using museum collections of pteropods to decipher how they have been affected by ocean acidification since the industrial revolution.

Why I put a pteropod in a CT scanner to study the impacts of ocean acidification Read More »

Carbon Comes Home—Kelp Aquaculture to Benefit both Sea and Soil

During this webinar, Meg Chadsey of Washington Sea Grant, will share the evolving story of phytoremediation and an experimental kelp farm in Washington’s Hood Canal. A serendipitous partnership with a local terrestrial farmer, review of relevant curricular materials published by Maine’s Island Institute and others, and an explanation of how phytoremediation can be used to teach essential concepts about the earth’s carbon cycle will all be discussed. 

Carbon Comes Home—Kelp Aquaculture to Benefit both Sea and Soil Read More »

OAP Helps Build Ocean Acidification Capacity for Pacific Island Nations

NOAA scientists and OAP staff will be educating and training scientists on ocean acidification monitoring in Suva, Fiji on 30 Oct – 10 Nov 2017. Scientists from several Pacific Island nations will convene at the University of the South Pacific to learn best methods for measuring ocean chemistry from experts in the Global Ocean Acidification Observing Network. 

OAP Helps Build Ocean Acidification Capacity for Pacific Island Nations Read More »

Science ↔ Society: Equilibrating Our Understanding of Ocean Acidification

During this webinar Carla Edworthy, a PhD candidate at the South African Institute for Aquatic Biodiversity, shared her experience with mobilising citizen and professional science in South Africa by means of a continentally co-ordinated event on World Ocean Day 2017. It will highlight the methods of engagement with both the science and non-science community as well as present the various challenges and lessons learnt from this experience.

Science ↔ Society: Equilibrating Our Understanding of Ocean Acidification Read More »

Pteropods as Indicators of Global Change: From Research to Education

The shelled pteropods in the genus Limacina have been identified as an indicator species for monitoring the advancement of ocean acidification throughout the world’s oceans. This is primarily due to the sensitive nature of pteropod shells to changes in the pH of the ocean. In this presentation we will focus on pteropods in the Southern Ocean and use scanning electron micrographs to discuss the effects ocean acidification has on pteropod shells. We will cover information we have learned from laboratory experiments and field collections in both the Southern Ocean and the California Current Ecosystem to inspire use of this indicator organism in educational settings. 

Pteropods as Indicators of Global Change: From Research to Education Read More »

Webinar: 4th National Climate Assessment: Oceans and Marine Resources Chapter, Public Feedback

Andy Pershing, Gulf of Maine Research Institute & Fred Lipschultz, US Global Change Research Program Join us for a webinar on Monday, March 20th to provide feedback on the 4th National Climate Assessment!Time: 3:00pm EST (12:00pm PST)Presented by: Andy Pershing, Gulf of Maine Research Institute, Chapter Lead AuthoFred Lipschultz, US Global Change Research Program, USGCRP Chapter ContactRegister: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/7271981171002454017 The National Climate Assessment (NCA) is

Webinar: 4th National Climate Assessment: Oceans and Marine Resources Chapter, Public Feedback Read More »

Ocean Acidification Discussion

The discussion is taking place during the preparatory process for The Ocean Conference in order to engage stakeholders in assessing the challenges and opportunities related to delivering on implementation of SDG14.3 aimed at minimizing and addressing the impacts of ocean acidification. The discussion runs from 9 – 30 March 2017.  Dr. Libby Jewett, Director of NOAA's Ocean Acidification Program, is participating as a moderator. 

Ocean Acidification Discussion Read More »

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ADAPTING TO OCEAN ACIDIFICATION

The NOAA Ocean Acidification Program (OAP) works to prepare society to adapt to the consequences of ocean acidification and conserve marine ecosystems as acidification occurs. Learn more about the human connections and adaptation strategies from these efforts.

Adaptation approaches fostered by the OAP include:

FORECASTING

Using models and research to understand the sensitivity of organisms and ecosystems to ocean acidification to make predictions about the future, allowing communities and industries to prepare

MANAGEMENT

Using these models and predictions as tools to facilitate management strategies that will protect marine resources and communities from future changes

TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT

Developing innovative tools to help monitor ocean acidification and mitigate changing ocean chemistry locally

REDUCING OUR CARBON FOOTPRINT

On the Road

Drive fuel-efficient vehicles or choose public transportation. Choose your bike or walk! Don't sit idle for more than 30 seconds. Keep your tires properly inflated.

With your Food Choices

Eat local- this helps cut down on production and transport! Reduce your meat and dairy. Compost to avoid food waste ending up in the landfill

With your Food Choices

Make energy-efficient choices for your appliances and lighting. Heat and cool efficiently! Change your air filters and program your thermostat, seal and insulate your home, and support clean energy sources

By Reducing Coastal Acidification

Reduce your use of fertilizers, Improve sewage treatment and run off, and Protect and restore coastal habitats

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TAKE ACTION WITH YOUR COMMUNITY

You've taken the first step to learn more about ocean acidification - why not spread this knowledge to your community?

Every community has their unique culture, economy and ecology and what’s at stake from ocean acidification may be different depending on where you live.  As a community member, you can take a larger role in educating the public about ocean acidification. Creating awareness is the first step to taking action.  As communities gain traction, neighboring regions that share marine resources can build larger coalitions to address ocean acidification.  Here are some ideas to get started:

  1. Work with informal educators, such as aquarium outreach programs and local non-profits, to teach the public about ocean acidification. Visit our Education & Outreach page to find the newest tools!
  2. Participate in habitat restoration efforts to restore habitats that help mitigate the effects of coastal acidification
  3. Facilitate conversations with local businesses that might be affected by ocean acidification, building a plan for the future.
  4. Partner with local community efforts to mitigate the driver behind ocean acidification  – excess CO2 – such as community supported agriculture, bike & car shares and other public transportation options.
  5. Contact your regional Coastal Acidification Network (CAN) to learn how OA is affecting your region and more ideas about how you can get involved in your community
       More for Taking Community Action