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Job Postings

Ernest F. Hollings Undergraduate Scholarship

The Hollings Scholarship provides successful undergraduate applicants with awards that include academic assistance (up to $9,500 per year) for two years of full-time study and a 10-week, full-time paid ($700/week) internship at a NOAA facility during the summer.
The internship between the first and second years of the award provides the scholars with hands-on, practical experience in NOAA-related science, research, technology, policy, management, and education activities. Awards also include travel funds to attend a mandatory NOAA Scholarship Program orientation and the annual Science & Education Symposium, scientific conferences where students present their research, and a housing subsidy for scholars who do not reside at home during the summer internship.
The internship between the first and second years of the award provides the scholars with hands-on, practical experience in NOAA-related science, research, technology, policy, management, and education activities. Awards also include travel funds to attend a mandatory NOAA Scholarship Program orientation and the annual Science & Education Symposium, scientific conferences where students present their research, and a housing subsidy for scholars who do not reside at home during the summer internship.
Who Should apply: Undergraduates who are US citizens enrolled or accepted at an accredited college or university within the United States or U.S. territories as either: 1) a full-time 2nd year student in a four-year undergraduate program; 2) a full-time 3rd year student in a five-year undergraduate program; or 3) a community college or transfer student who is applying to a four-year institution

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Knauss Marine Policy Fellowship

The Sea Grant Fellowship provides a unique, educational and professional experience to graduate students who have an interest in ocean, coastal and Great Lakes resources and in the national policy decisions affecting these resources.  The Fellowship, named after one of Sea Grant’s founders NOAA Administrator John A. Knauss, matches highly qualified graduate students with “hosts” in the legislative and executive branch of government located in Washington, D.C. area, for a one year paid fellowship.
Who should apply: Those enrolled towards a degree in a graduate program at any point between the onset of the 2020 Fall Term (quarter, trimester, semester, etc.) and February 19, 2021.

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Maryland Sea Grant Research Experiences for Undergraduate (REU) program in marine and estuarine science

Maryland Sea Grant offers fifteen undergraduates the opportunity to conduct marine research on the Chesapeake Bay. During this 12-week program, each student will work with science mentors on an individual research project. Fifteen undergraduates are selected to conduct marine research on Chesapeake Bay. Research areas include environmental chemistry, physical oceanography, molecular biology and genetics.
Who should apply:  Students majoring in biology, chemistry, ecology, physics, engineering, mathematics, and marine and environmental science. Encourage applicants from colleges and universities where research opportunities are limited and from groups underrepresented in marine and coastal science to apply

Maryland Sea Grant Research Experiences for Undergraduate (REU) program in marine and estuarine science Read More »

Chesapeake Student Recruitment, Early Advisement, and Mentoring (C-StREAM)

C-StREAM is focused on recruiting, advising, and mentoring college students from populations who have been historically excluded from the environmental field and are underrepresented in environmental research and management professions. For the purpose of this program, C-StREAM focuses on assisting students who identify as people of color and/or who are first generation college students.  The program works closely with academic institutions as well as government agencies within the Chesapeake Bay Program partnership to place selected students into meaningful summer internships. The summer 2021 C-StREAM internship program run May 24, 2021 – August 13, 2021. All C-StREAM Fellows will receive a stipend up to $6,000 ($500/week).
Who should apply:   C-StREAM is intended for any continuing undergraduate, at any level of study (including seniors pursuing graduate studies in the fall) who identifies as being one or both of the following: a person of color and/or a first generation college student.

Chesapeake Student Recruitment, Early Advisement, and Mentoring (C-StREAM) Read More »

Research Experience for Undergraduates: Gulf of Maine Research Institute

The GMRI REU Site will pair students with researchers based at GMRI, engaged in a broad range of fishery ecosystem and climate adaptation studies. In consultation with their mentor, students will design and conduct a 10-week intensive, independent research project. This may involve field sampling, laboratory experiments, analysis of existing data sets, computational simulations, or some mix of these. At the end of the summer, students will present their findings at an in-house symposium drawing on analysis and communications skills honed throughout the summer.
This internship opportunity includes a stipend ($500/week for 10 weeks), support for housing costs, and meal allowance.  
Who Should apply:   Undergraduate students from a broad range of institutions and backgrounds including two- and four-year colleges and underserved communities (e.g., minorities, students with disabilities, first-generation college students, veterans).
 

Research Experience for Undergraduates: Gulf of Maine Research Institute Read More »

Woods Hole Partnership Education Program (PEP)

The Woods Hole Partnership Education Program (PEP) is a multi-institutional program between the 6 Woods Hole scientific institutions and the academic partner, the University of Maryland Eastern Shore. It is a 10-week program designed primarily for college juniors and seniors from underrepresented groups in marine and ocean sciences who want to spend a summer gaining practical experience in marine and environmental science. The program consists of a four-week course and a ten-week research project – all in Woods Hole.

Who should apply:   PEP recruits from all backgrounds, but especially from minority groups that are under-represented in marine and environmental sciences. African American, Hispanic American, Native American, Asian Pacific Island, and Alaska Native students are particularly encouraged to apply.  Priority is given to entering juniors and seniors majoring in the natural sciences or engineering, mathematics, or social sciences. Applicants must also have completed some course work in either oceanography, biology, or marine and/or environmental science

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Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center Young Scientist Opportunity

Paid Internships (8–12 weeks) that offer professional scientific research experience and formal training opportunities for undergraduate college students. 
This program offers professional scientific research experience and formal training opportunities for qualified participants tailored to meet their educational and professional goals and interests.

The Young Scientists Opportunity enables participants to work under the guidance of talented staff at the Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center who will provide challenging work opportunities and one-on-one mentoring in the participant’s field of study
Who Should apply:   Full-time status, degree-seeking undergraduate students with no fewer than 24 credit hours earned at an accredited college or university, and who will not be graduating until after fall quarter/semester 2020 (sophomores, juniors, and non-graduating seniors).

Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center Young Scientist Opportunity Read More »

EPA Coastal Acidification Vulnerability Research Opportunity

A research training opportunity is available at the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Office of Research and Development (ORD), Center for Public Health and Environmental Assessment (CPHEA), Pacific Ecological Systems Division (PESD) in Newport, Oregon. The research participant will participate in a research project focused on assessing the role of land-based drivers of coastal acidification in estuaries of the United States. The project will utilize existing and novel biogeochemical, spatial, and model data to evaluate the patterns and trends of estuarine acidification in estuaries around the U.S.  This research project will help inform a vulnerability assessment of U.S. estuaries to land-based sources of acidification, including the roles of eutrophication and land use change. Activities that the research participant may be involved in include:

  • Field activities including sampling streams and estuaries for water chemistry, and servicing water quality instrumentation.
  • Compiling and analyzing datasets of stream and estuarine water quality (including nutrients, pH, alkalinity, and stable isotopes), land use, and other relevant indicators of land-based sources of acidification.
  • Compiling scientific literature relevant to the project.
  • Collaborating with government and academic researchers to help develop hydrodynamic and biogeochemical models of coastal and estuarine systems.
  • Contributing to scientific manuscripts and presentations on this research project, including opportunities for presenting at scientific conferences.

Applications are due January 29, 2021 at 3:00pm ET. 
Details here: https://zintellect.com/Opportunity/Details/EPA-ORD-CPHEA-PESD-2020-05

EPA Coastal Acidification Vulnerability Research Opportunity Read More »

Announcing Ocean Acidification Graduate Research Fellowships in Texas and Louisiana

The Louisiana Sea Grant and Texas Sea Grant Programs, in partnership with the NOAA Ocean Acidification Program (OAP), are pleased to announce the availability of Ocean Acidification Graduate Research Fellowships for the two-year period covering the 2020/2021 and 2021/2022 academic years. The fellowship provides a total award of $46,000 per year for two years.
The fellowship is open to full-time graduate students at any academic institution in Louisiana and Texas who are engaged in coastal and marine research relevant to regional ocean, coastal, and estuarine acidification. In addition to supporting the student’s academic expenses, the fellowship will provide additional professional development opportunities throughout its duration, focusing on science communication, management application, outreach, and other Sea Grant and OAP activities and mission priorities.
Proposals are due before 5:00 p.m. ET on Friday, April 17, 2020. For more information go to 

Announcing Ocean Acidification Graduate Research Fellowships in Texas and Louisiana Read More »

Postdoctoral Researcher in Marine Ecology

Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences is seeking a postdoctoral marine ecologist interested in applying research on determining the phytoremediation potential by farmed macroalgae species. Our aim is to identify the conditions under which co-cultivation of blue mussels and farmed kelp is mutually beneficial and can mitigate stresses from coastal acidification. This position is initially funded for 1 year and will offer opportunities for multi-institution and transdisciplinary collaboration, pursuit of independent funding, and training in molecular-based approaches to determine fate of kelp detritus if desired.
Please submit a cover letter and CV using Bigelow's online application portal. Screening of candidates will begin February 24, 2020 with expectation candidate will be available in April of 2020.

Postdoctoral Researcher in Marine Ecology Read More »

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ADAPTING TO OCEAN ACIDIFICATION

The NOAA Ocean Acidification Program (OAP) works to prepare society to adapt to the consequences of ocean acidification and conserve marine ecosystems as acidification occurs. Learn more about the human connections and adaptation strategies from these efforts.

Adaptation approaches fostered by the OAP include:

FORECASTING

Using models and research to understand the sensitivity of organisms and ecosystems to ocean acidification to make predictions about the future, allowing communities and industries to prepare

MANAGEMENT

Using these models and predictions as tools to facilitate management strategies that will protect marine resources and communities from future changes

TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT

Developing innovative tools to help monitor ocean acidification and mitigate changing ocean chemistry locally

REDUCING OUR CARBON FOOTPRINT

On the Road

Drive fuel-efficient vehicles or choose public transportation. Choose your bike or walk! Don't sit idle for more than 30 seconds. Keep your tires properly inflated.

With your Food Choices

Eat local- this helps cut down on production and transport! Reduce your meat and dairy. Compost to avoid food waste ending up in the landfill

With your Food Choices

Make energy-efficient choices for your appliances and lighting. Heat and cool efficiently! Change your air filters and program your thermostat, seal and insulate your home, and support clean energy sources

By Reducing Coastal Acidification

Reduce your use of fertilizers, Improve sewage treatment and run off, and Protect and restore coastal habitats

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TAKE ACTION WITH YOUR COMMUNITY

You've taken the first step to learn more about ocean acidification - why not spread this knowledge to your community?

Every community has their unique culture, economy and ecology and what’s at stake from ocean acidification may be different depending on where you live.  As a community member, you can take a larger role in educating the public about ocean acidification. Creating awareness is the first step to taking action.  As communities gain traction, neighboring regions that share marine resources can build larger coalitions to address ocean acidification.  Here are some ideas to get started:

  1. Work with informal educators, such as aquarium outreach programs and local non-profits, to teach the public about ocean acidification. Visit our Education & Outreach page to find the newest tools!
  2. Participate in habitat restoration efforts to restore habitats that help mitigate the effects of coastal acidification
  3. Facilitate conversations with local businesses that might be affected by ocean acidification, building a plan for the future.
  4. Partner with local community efforts to mitigate the driver behind ocean acidification  – excess CO2 – such as community supported agriculture, bike & car shares and other public transportation options.
  5. Contact your regional Coastal Acidification Network (CAN) to learn how OA is affecting your region and more ideas about how you can get involved in your community
       More for Taking Community Action