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NOAA OAP established 2011

Required by the 2009 FOARAM Act

NOAA OAP established 2011

NOAA OAP established 2011

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Monitoring Ocean Acidification

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Monitoring Ocean Acidification

Monitoring Ocean Acidification

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Biological Response

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Biological Response

Biological Response

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Socio-Economic Impacts

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Socio-Economic Impacts

Socio-Economic Impacts

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Adaptation Strategies

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Adaptation Strategies

Adaptation Strategies

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Education & Outreach

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Education & Outreach

Education & Outreach

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Data Collection & Management

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Data Collection & Management

Data Collection & Management

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Interagency Working Group on Ocean Acidification

Interagency Working Group on Ocean Acidification

Interagency Working Group on Ocean Acidification

Interagency Working Group on Ocean Acidification

NSF Research technician – Ocean acidification and coral reefs

California State University, Northridge (CSUN)

2.5-year, NSF-funded technician position at California State University, Northridge (CSUN), to support research in the area of ocean acidification (OA) and its effects on corals, algae, and coral reefs in Moorea. The successful candidate will work under the supervision of RC Carpenter and PJ Edmunds (grant PIs, robert.carpenter@csun.edu and peter.edmunds@csun.edu), as well as a postdoctoral scholar, to elucidate the effects of OA on corals, algae, and coral reefs in Moorea.

Tuesday, January 19, 2016
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NOAA awards will help improve projections of acidification impacts in changing coastal waters

NOAA awards will help improve projections of acidification impacts in changing coastal waters

Awards of $1.3 million this year, totaling $4.1 million over three years, will focus on understanding the combined effects of ocean acidification, low oxygen and nutrient pollution on economically and ecologically important species in coastal habitats.

It is clear that our ocean is becoming more acidic as a result of carbon dioxide seeping into open ocean surface waters. But closer to shore things become a bit murky, as other factors can also change the chemistry of coastal waters. In these waters which are home to many important marine organisms on which coastal communities rely, scientists will be working to shed light on the potential impacts of acidification and other stresses.

Monday, January 4, 2016
Acid trip: Great Lakes could face similar acidification risk as the seas

Acid trip: Great Lakes could face similar acidification risk as the seas

By Brian Bienkowski (The Daily Climate)

As in the oceans, carbon dioxide from the atmosphere could throw off water chemistry in large freshwater bodies like the Great Lakes, putting the food web at risk. But the science remains unsettled and, according to researchers, must be bolstered if we are to understand what increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide means for freshwater.
Wednesday, December 16, 2015
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NOAA Funds Seven New Projects to Increase Understanding and Response to Climate Impacts on U.S. Fisheries

NOAA Funds Seven New Projects to Increase Understanding and Response to Climate Impacts on U.S. Fisheries

NOAA

NOAA Fisheries Office of Science and Technology has teamed up with the NOAA Research Climate Program Office to study the impacts of a changing climate on the fish and fisheries of the Northeast Shelf Large Marine Ecosystem. Together, these offices are providing $5.0 million in grant funding over the next three years to support seven new projects.

Tuesday, December 15, 2015
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Northwest Oyster Die-offs Show Ocean Acidification Has Arrived

Northwest Oyster Die-offs Show Ocean Acidification Has Arrived

Elizabeth Grossman

Standing on the shores of Netarts Bay in Oregon on a sunny fall morning, it’s hard to imagine that the fate of the oysters being raised here at the Whiskey Creek Shellfish Hatchery is being determined by what came out of smokestacks and tailpipes in the 1960s and ‘70s. But this rural coastal spot and the shellfish it has nurtured for centuries are a bellwether of one of the most palpable changes being caused by global carbon dioxide emissions —ocean acidification.

Wednesday, December 2, 2015
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