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OAP Opportunities

NSF Research technician – Ocean acidification and coral reefs

2.5-year, NSF-funded technician position at California State University, Northridge (CSUN), to support research in the area of ocean acidification (OA) and its effects on corals, algae, and coral reefs in Moorea. The successful candidate will work under the supervision of RC Carpenter and PJ Edmunds (grant PIs, robert.carpenter@csun.edu and peter.edmunds@csun.edu), as well as a postdoctoral scholar, to elucidate the effects of OA on corals, algae, and coral reefs in Moorea.

NSF Research technician – Ocean acidification and coral reefs Read More »

THE NOAA CORAL REEF CONSERVATION PROGRAM

Who: This competitive program provides funding to institutions of higher education, non-profit organizations, for-profit organizations, and local and Indian tribal government agencies to support coral reef conservation projects in the United States, as authorized under the Coral Reef Conservation Act of 2000 (16 U.S.C. §§ 6401-6409).
Where: These awards are intended to support coral reef conservation projects in shallow water coral reef ecosystems, including reefs at mesophotic depths, in American Samoa, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, Florida, Guam, Hawaii, Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands, and coral-dominated banks in U.S. portions of the Gulf of Mexico. Projects may be proposed in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands and the U.S. Pacific Remote Islands, but these locations are not considered geographic priorities under this announcement.
Program Priorities: 1) Fishing Impacts; 2) Land-Based Sources of Pollution; 3) Climate Change; and 4) Local and Emerging Management Issues (coral disease, invasive species, ornamental trade, and endangered species). These categories are described in more detail in the full Federal Funding Opportunity announcement.  All proposed work should be consistent with the Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) National Goals and Objectives 2010-2015
(http://coralreef.noaa.gov/aboutcrcp/strategy/currentgoals/resources/3threats_go.pdf; still current) and/or the relevant Jurisdictional Coral Reef Management Priorities.
(http://coralreef.noaa.gov/aboutcrcp/strategy/reprioritization/managementpriorities) developed for each of the seven states and territories.
Funding Amount: Applicants may propose projects that include a Federal funding amount between $30,000 and $80,000; the average Federal funding amount for successful projects will be approximately $50,000. Applicants must provide a 1:1 match of non-Federal funds or must submit a request to NOAA to waive the matching requirement if the applicant can demonstrate 1) no reasonable means are available through which an applicant can meet the matching requirement, and 2) the probable benefit of the project outweighs the public interest in such matching requirement.
How: Applicants should apply through www.grants.gov; however, applicants unable to use www.grants.gov may mail a complete application package including the required Federal forms, which must be signed by hand and dated. All applications should follow the specific application requirements described in the full Federal funding opportunity announcement.
When: Applications must be submitted via www.grants.gov by 

THE NOAA CORAL REEF CONSERVATION PROGRAM Read More »

NORTHEAST SEA GRANT COLLEGE CONSORTIUM

The Northeast Sea Grant Consortium (consisting of the Sea Grant programs in the Northeast including New York, Connecticut, Rhode Island, MIT, Woods Hole, New Hampshire, Maine and Lake Champlain), in partnership with the NOAA Ocean Acidification Program (OAP), is seeking proposals to address the impacts of ocean acidification (OA) on key resource species in the northeast (New York Bight to the Gulf of Maine) as an aid to assist coastal communities in adapting to current and future OA conditions in the region.
Learn more here.

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FY2016 NOAA SMALL BUSINESS INNOVATION RESEARCH (SBIR)

NOAA's SBIR Program is seeking highly innovative products with excellent commercial potential. All SBIR proposals must directly benefit the NOAA mission, but should also be responsive to the greater market demands in order to be successful. All SBIR applications must be made in response to a NOAA solicitation, which will be made available once per year on this site and through the Federal Register.
Proposals are due January 14, 2016. Learn more here.

FY2016 NOAA SMALL BUSINESS INNOVATION RESEARCH (SBIR) Read More »

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ADAPTING TO OCEAN ACIDIFICATION

The NOAA Ocean Acidification Program (OAP) works to prepare society to adapt to the consequences of ocean acidification and conserve marine ecosystems as acidification occurs. Learn more about the human connections and adaptation strategies from these efforts.

Adaptation approaches fostered by the OAP include:

FORECASTING

Using models and research to understand the sensitivity of organisms and ecosystems to ocean acidification to make predictions about the future, allowing communities and industries to prepare

MANAGEMENT

Using these models and predictions as tools to facilitate management strategies that will protect marine resources and communities from future changes

TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT

Developing innovative tools to help monitor ocean acidification and mitigate changing ocean chemistry locally

REDUCING OUR CARBON FOOTPRINT

On the Road

Drive fuel-efficient vehicles or choose public transportation. Choose your bike or walk! Don't sit idle for more than 30 seconds. Keep your tires properly inflated.

With your Food Choices

Eat local- this helps cut down on production and transport! Reduce your meat and dairy. Compost to avoid food waste ending up in the landfill

With your Food Choices

Make energy-efficient choices for your appliances and lighting. Heat and cool efficiently! Change your air filters and program your thermostat, seal and insulate your home, and support clean energy sources

By Reducing Coastal Acidification

Reduce your use of fertilizers, Improve sewage treatment and run off, and Protect and restore coastal habitats

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TAKE ACTION WITH YOUR COMMUNITY

You've taken the first step to learn more about ocean acidification - why not spread this knowledge to your community?

Every community has their unique culture, economy and ecology and what’s at stake from ocean acidification may be different depending on where you live.  As a community member, you can take a larger role in educating the public about ocean acidification. Creating awareness is the first step to taking action.  As communities gain traction, neighboring regions that share marine resources can build larger coalitions to address ocean acidification.  Here are some ideas to get started:

  1. Work with informal educators, such as aquarium outreach programs and local non-profits, to teach the public about ocean acidification. Visit our Education & Outreach page to find the newest tools!
  2. Participate in habitat restoration efforts to restore habitats that help mitigate the effects of coastal acidification
  3. Facilitate conversations with local businesses that might be affected by ocean acidification, building a plan for the future.
  4. Partner with local community efforts to mitigate the driver behind ocean acidification  – excess CO2 – such as community supported agriculture, bike & car shares and other public transportation options.
  5. Contact your regional Coastal Acidification Network (CAN) to learn how OA is affecting your region and more ideas about how you can get involved in your community
       More for Taking Community Action