Assistant Research Scientist/Faculty Specialist position to support NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information

University of Maryland

The University of Maryland / Cooperative Institute for Satellite Earth System Studies (UMD/CISESS) seeks a talented and self-motivated candidate to start a new and promising career supporting the research, development, and transition projects funded by the NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI). Specifically, the scientist will support ocean acidification data management data product development, generate gridded coastal and global ocean data products by using NCEI's World Ocean Atlas tools (Fortran based), support data management activities for shipboard data, and collaborate with NOAA scientists. 

Find more information and apply here.

Wednesday, June 29, 2022
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Assessing risks of ocean acidification in south-central and southeast Alaska

Tom Hurst - NOAA Alaska Fisheries Science Center

Evaluating ocean acidification vulnerability and interactions among traditional and coastal Alaska industries

Why we care
Many marine species affected by ocean acidification (OA) contribute to Alaska’s highly productive commercial fisheries and traditional subsistence ways of life. Concern exists that acidification will cause ecosystem-level shifts, diminishing the overall economic value of commercial fisheries and reducing food security for communities relying on subsistence harvests. 

What we are doing
This project addresses acidification threats in south-central and southeast Alaska. It involves the development of decision support tools incorporating acidification risks into localized socio-ecological systems. The tools are based on a network of models representing acidification hazards, bio-ecological systems, and socioeconomic systems linked to adaptive actions.

Benefits of our work
This project is an exchange of knowledge between scientists, policy makers, and community stakeholders. The network of models creates decision support tools responsive to stakeholder concerns that reflect regional variation in community priorities and their ecological social and management context. The project synthesizes the best available science to determine the risks posed by ocean acidification.

Thursday, June 23, 2022

Understanding biodiversity in the Gulf of Mexico using eDNA

Luke Thompson - Mississippi State University

Assessing ecosystem responses of Gulf of Mexico coastal communities to ocean acidification using environmental DNA

Why we care 
Recent efforts to monitor ocean acidification in the Gulf of Mexico via the Gulf of Mexico Ecosystems and Carbon Cycle (GOMECC) cruises have revealed spatial differences in ocean acidification. While we know that ocean acidification negatively impacts many species and exacerbates the effects of oxygen limitation and harmful algal blooms, there is little work to monitor or predict the effects of ocean acidification on biodiversity. This project employs cutting-edge technology using environmental DNA to assess biodiversity in different conditions in the Gulf of Mexico region.

What we are doing
Every organism sheds DNA. This project analyzes environmental DNA (eDNA), which is free-floating or microscopic DNA found in seawater, collected during the 4th GOMECC cruise, to identify biodiversity of bacteria, plankton, and fish in the Gulf of Mexico. eDNA will be compared to ocean properties to draw conclusions about drivers of biodiversity. 

Benefits of our work
Links between eDNA, ocean acidification, and other ocean properties will provide a deeper understanding of environmental drivers of biodiversity. These relationships can inform predictions of biodiversity patterns and guide the management of key habitats in the Gulf of Mexico, and help us adapt to changing ocean conditions.


Tuesday, June 14, 2022

Next-Gen gene sequencing to understand effects of ocean acidification on Alaskan crab and fish

Chris Long - NOAA/NMFS Alaska Fisheries Science Center

Using next-generation sequencing techniques to assess adaptive capacity and illuminate mechanisms underlying the effects of high pCO2 on Alaskan crab and fish species

Why we care
Many economically important crab and fish species are negatively affected by exposure to ocean acidification predicted to occur throughout their ranges in the coming decades. Ocean acidification results in decreased growth, altered development, weaker exoskeletons, increased energy outputs, altered immune systems, altered behavior, and increased mortality in some of these species. Other stressors such as increased temperature can have interactive negative effects when combined with ocean acidification. Traditional laboratory experiments cannot duplicate the gradual changes that will affect species populations over multiple life-history stages and generations, so using next-generation genetic approaches provide insight into effects beyond specific life stages.

What we are doing 
This study will use next-generation sequencing techniques to identify specific alterations in the molecular, metabolic, and physiological pathways of individuals exposed to ocean acidification. This is a way to identify pathways that impart tolerance to ocean acidification and warming. This project determines the effect of ocean acidification and thermal stress on gene expression in Pacific cod larvae and juvenile Tanner crab and identifies genetic markers indicating ocean acidification resilience. 

Benefits of our work
Investigators will identify the cellular pathways that impart tolerance to ocean acidification. By comparing individuals that demonstrate low sensitivity to ocean acidification and with the general population, we enhance the ability to predict how adaptation will alter the species’ response to future ocean conditions. This research will inform the fishing industry and coastal, fisheries-dependent Alaskan communities about potential effects of ocean change on commercially important species. Outcomes can be used to drive future responses and adaptations in these industries regarding affected fisheries.

Thursday, May 26, 2022

Funding Opportunity: Interagency Working Group on Research for Farming Seaweeds and Seagrasses

External Funding Opportunity Due June 1, 2022

The Bigelow Center for Seafood Solutions is excited to announce the request for applications for funding to support pilot studies relevant to the Interagency Working Group on Research for Farming of Seaweeds and Seagrasses, chaired by the USDA’s Agricultural Research Service and operating in partnership with the Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences' Center for Seafood Solutions.

Three $100,000 awards will be granted to academic institutions or research nonprofits leading new research endeavors aimed to (1) deacidify ocean environments, (2) produce feedstock for agriculture applications, OR (3) develop other scalable applications for seaweed, seagrasses, or products derived from them.

To apply, go to the application login page below and click "CREATE NEW ACCOUNT" to set up a new account:

https://www.grantinterface.com/Home/Logon?urlkey=bigelow

All applicant eligibility and application requirements can be found on the application homepage.

Submission Deadline: June 1, 2022 5PM EDT

Applications will be reviewed by an academic panel and awards made this August. 
Monday, April 25, 2022
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