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funding opportunity

funding: education mini-grant opportunity announced

The NOAA Ocean Acidification Program (OAP) is pleased to announce the launch of the FY24 Education Mini-grant Program! The principal objective of this grant opportunity is to provide federal financial assistance to develop ocean and coastal acidification education tools and programs in underserved and/or Indigenous communities or Tribes. To learn more about this federal funded opportunity, […]

funding: education mini-grant opportunity announced Read More »

Ocean Acidification Coastal Research: Uniting Investigations and Shipboard Experiments (OA CRUISE) Funding Opportunity

NOAA’s Ocean Acidification Program (OAP) is soliciting cruise project proposals to complement core observing activities on existing cruises as part of its upcoming coastal ocean acidification (OA) cruises targeting the US Coastal Large Marine Ecosystems. The proposed activities should provide for expanded OA observational and experimental capabilities of repeated oceanographic research cruises to better achieve the strategic aims of the program.

Ocean Acidification Coastal Research: Uniting Investigations and Shipboard Experiments (OA CRUISE) Funding Opportunity Read More »

2023 American Lobster Research Program Funding Opportunity Now Open

APPLY FOR UP TO $500K IN FY2023 Sea Grant announces a new funding opportunity for collaborative projects that address priority research needs to enhance our understanding of and address impacts to the American lobster fishery in the Gulf of Maine, Georges Bank, and southern New England. The program seeks applications from research teams and encourages

2023 American Lobster Research Program Funding Opportunity Now Open Read More »

Announcing Funding Opportunity in Marine Carbon Dioxide Removal (mCDR)- Opportunity Closed

The NOAA Ocean Acidification Program on behalf of the National Oceanographic Partnership Program (NOPP) solicits proposals focused on (a) expanding understanding of various aspects of marine Carbon Dioxide Removal (mCDR); (b) understanding associated co-benefits (including ocean acidification mitigation) and risks of marine CDR; and (c) the science needed to build building regulatory frameworks for both testing and scaling of marine CDR approaches. This knowledge will assist in the verification or invalidation of hypotheses regarding mCDR, in order to make informed decisions regarding a potential scaled negative carbon ocean industry. 
To be eligible under this NOPP funding opportunity, each proposing team must comprise participants from at least two of the following sectors: academia, private sector (including Non-Governmental Organizations, or NGOs), or government (including federal, tribal, state, and local). Participants in this multi-agency request for proposals include: NOAA (Ocean Acidification Program, Global Ocean Monitoring and Observing Program, US Integrated Ocean Observing System/US IOOS), the Department of Energy (Fossil Energy and Carbon Management, Water Power Technologies Office), Department of Navy (Office of Naval Research), the National Science Foundation (Chemical Oceanography Program) and philanthropies including ClimateWorks. 
To facilitate cross-sectoral networking and the formation of new partnerships, our NOFO partners, ClimateWorks Foundation has created a networking resource for individuals who are leading proposals and seeking new partnerships as well as individuals interested in participating in a proposal and being discoverable.

See here for more network details: http://tinyurl.com/NOPPmCDRnetwork.
This form produces a publicly available spreadsheet.

View the FULL NOTICE OF FEDERAL FUNDING
An informational webinar will be held on December 7, 2022 at 4-5pm ET. REGISTER HERE 
Webinar slides are attached.
View the webinar.
Read the FAQs.
 

Announcing Funding Opportunity in Marine Carbon Dioxide Removal (mCDR)- Opportunity Closed Read More »

NOAA Invests in Harmful Algal Bloom and Ocean Acidification Research

NOAA invests $18.9M in a coordinated effort to maximize advances in harmful algal bloom (HAB) mitigation, monitoring and forecasting. Four of new research awards support ($1.5M) funded in partnership by NOAA’s National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS) and NOAA’s Ocean Acidification program will determine interactive effects of HABs and ocean acidification. Other projects supported through this effort will establish a U.S. Harmful Algal Bloom Control Incubator, enhance detection of HAB toxins and improve forecasts and investigate the socioeconomic impacts of HABs. Read more
Project Highlights
University of MichiganUniversity of Minnesota DuluthOberlin CollegeUniversity of Kentucky, and University of Toledo received $281,975 to improve our understanding of the synergistic impacts of acidification, temperature, total alkalinity, and nutrients on toxic cyanobacteria harmful algal blooms in the Great Lakes. 
Woods Hole Oceanographic InstituteBowdoin College, and NERACOOS received $499,999 to address gaps in understanding relationships between harmful algal bloom behavior and ocean acidification in the northeast Atlantic, especially where it is associated with coastal eutrophication and hypoxia.
Stony Brook UniversityAdelphi University, and St. Joseph’s College received $364,265 to establish a comprehensive understanding of how three of the most prominent HABs on the US east coast respond to ocean acidification, and how their co-occurrence will economically impact fisheries and shellfisheries. 
Northwest Indian CollegeSan Francisco State University, and University of Washington received $355,281 to understand the current relationships between ocean acidification and harmful algal bloom interactions in the Salish Sea, and to quantify how ocean acidification influences growth and toxicity. 
📸 Autonomous glider collects information to track harmful algal blooms and water quality. Credit: Ben Yair Raanan, MBARI

NOAA Invests in Harmful Algal Bloom and Ocean Acidification Research Read More »

Letters of Intent Due January 24th, 2020

The Ocean Acidification Program is soliciting proposals for collaborative projects of up to 3 years in duration that synthesize ocean acidification information at a regional scale (e.g. Large Marine Ecosystem, large estuary or collection of small estuaries, and state or collection of states in US waters) to determine where societal vulnerabilities to ocean acidification exist or are emerging, in order to provide actionable information for marine resource decision makers. This funding opportunity will not support the collection of new chemical or ecological observations or species response data. Social science data collection is permitted.

Information about this opportunity can be found here:https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/search-grants.html?keywords=11.017 This grant is Funding Opportunity Number: NOAA-OAR-OAP-2020-2006333.  Email Letters of Intent to erica.h.ombres@noaa.gov. Full proposals should be submitted through grants.gov
Important dates:  Letters of Intent are due January 24th and full proposals are due March 27th. 

RESOURCES: NEWS TITLE BAR

Letters of Intent Due January 24th, 2020 Read More »

North Pacific Research Board’s Request For Proposals Includes Ocean Acidification as a Research Priority

The North Pacific Research Board (NPRB) announces the release of its Core Program Request for Proposals (RFP). The 2018 RFP has an anticipated funding amount of $4.45 million. The North Pacific Research Board specifically lists ocean acidification as a topic of interest for proposed projects. 

North Pacific Research Board’s Request For Proposals Includes Ocean Acidification as a Research Priority Read More »

Federal funding opportunity: FY17 Domestic Coral Reef Conservation Grant Program

The NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Grant Program, 16 USC §§ 6401-6409, provides matching grants of financial assistance through the Domestic Coral Reef Conservation Grant program to institutions of higher education, non-profit organizations, for-profit organizations, and local (as defined at 2 CFR § 200.64, which includes counties, municipalities, and cities) and Indian tribal government agencies. These awards are intended to support coral reef conservation projects in shallow water coral reef ecosystems, including reefs at mesophotic depths, in American Samoa, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, Florida, Guam, Hawaii, Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands, and coral-dominated banks in the U.S. portions of the Gulf of Mexico. Projects may be proposed in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands and the U.S. Pacific Remote Island Areas, but these locations are not considered geographic priorities under this announcement. Proposals submitted to this competition must address at least one of the following four categories: 1) Fishing Impacts; 2) Land-Based Sources of Pollution; 3) Climate Change; and 4) Local and Emerging Management Issues. Each category is described in more detail in the Federal Funding Opportunity announcement. All proposed work must be consistent with Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) National Goals and Objectives 2010-2015. 
Interested applicants may obtain the full Federal Funding Opportunity announcement by visiting www.grants.gov, clicking on the “Search Grants, tab” and searching by funding opportunity number (NOAA-NOS-OCM-2017-2005011) or by CFDA number (11.482).

Federal funding opportunity: FY17 Domestic Coral Reef Conservation Grant Program Read More »

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ADAPTING TO OCEAN ACIDIFICATION

The NOAA Ocean Acidification Program (OAP) works to prepare society to adapt to the consequences of ocean acidification and conserve marine ecosystems as acidification occurs. Learn more about the human connections and adaptation strategies from these efforts.

Adaptation approaches fostered by the OAP include:

FORECASTING

Using models and research to understand the sensitivity of organisms and ecosystems to ocean acidification to make predictions about the future, allowing communities and industries to prepare

MANAGEMENT

Using these models and predictions as tools to facilitate management strategies that will protect marine resources and communities from future changes

TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT

Developing innovative tools to help monitor ocean acidification and mitigate changing ocean chemistry locally

REDUCING OUR CARBON FOOTPRINT

On the Road

Drive fuel-efficient vehicles or choose public transportation. Choose your bike or walk! Don't sit idle for more than 30 seconds. Keep your tires properly inflated.

With your Food Choices

Eat local- this helps cut down on production and transport! Reduce your meat and dairy. Compost to avoid food waste ending up in the landfill

With your Food Choices

Make energy-efficient choices for your appliances and lighting. Heat and cool efficiently! Change your air filters and program your thermostat, seal and insulate your home, and support clean energy sources

By Reducing Coastal Acidification

Reduce your use of fertilizers, Improve sewage treatment and run off, and Protect and restore coastal habitats

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TAKE ACTION WITH YOUR COMMUNITY

You've taken the first step to learn more about ocean acidification - why not spread this knowledge to your community?

Every community has their unique culture, economy and ecology and what’s at stake from ocean acidification may be different depending on where you live.  As a community member, you can take a larger role in educating the public about ocean acidification. Creating awareness is the first step to taking action.  As communities gain traction, neighboring regions that share marine resources can build larger coalitions to address ocean acidification.  Here are some ideas to get started:

  1. Work with informal educators, such as aquarium outreach programs and local non-profits, to teach the public about ocean acidification. Visit our Education & Outreach page to find the newest tools!
  2. Participate in habitat restoration efforts to restore habitats that help mitigate the effects of coastal acidification
  3. Facilitate conversations with local businesses that might be affected by ocean acidification, building a plan for the future.
  4. Partner with local community efforts to mitigate the driver behind ocean acidification  – excess CO2 – such as community supported agriculture, bike & car shares and other public transportation options.
  5. Contact your regional Coastal Acidification Network (CAN) to learn how OA is affecting your region and more ideas about how you can get involved in your community
       More for Taking Community Action