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OAP Original News Stories

Exploring our changing ocean announcement for StoryMaps about regional ocean acidification causes, impacts and actions. This is part of the OA Day of Action and released by NOAA OAP, Aquarium Conservation Partnership, and OA Alliance (2024). Title with graphic ocean and marine vegetation and life in the image. Credit: OA Alliance

OAP Recognizes OA Day of Action With New Resources

Today is January 8th marking a global “OA Day of Action” started by the Ocean Foundation to increase ocean acidification awareness and recognize 8.1, the current global average pH of the ocean. To recognize this day, NOAA OAP is proud to be launch an ocean acidification communications project with the Aquarium Conservation Partnership and International Alliance to Combat Ocean

OAP Recognizes OA Day of Action With New Resources Read More »

A vibrant coral reef is the background for the United States Ocean Acidification Action Plan, released December 10, 2023 at COP28

U. S. Ocean Acidification Action Plan Released

A Roadmap for the other National Ocean Acidification Action Plans The United States released the U.S. Ocean Acidification (OA) Action Plan during the United Nations Climate Change Conference (COP28) on December 10, 2023. This side event was co-hosted by NOAA Ocean Acidification Program, U.S. Department of State, and International Alliance to Combat Ocean Acidification (‘OA

U. S. Ocean Acidification Action Plan Released Read More »

Forging Connections between Industry and Scientists: The Start of the California Current Acidification Network

Over a decade ago, California sea urchin diver Bruce Steele discovered a scientific paper suggesting that sea urchins-the source of his livelihood-were facing a new threat called ocean acidification. At the time, there was very little research or information being shared among the West Coast fishing industry about how this change in ocean chemistry caused by the absorption of carbon dioxide emissions could impact sea urchins or other species.
Steele was hoping that the West Coast states could join together to address the potential impacts from ocean acidification to shellfish and fisheries.

Forging Connections between Industry and Scientists: The Start of the California Current Acidification Network Read More »

British Columbia to southern California: making headway with ocean change

On June 13, scientists aboard the NOAA Ship Ronald H. Brown set out on the West Coast Ocean Acidification Research Cruise to characterize conditions along the West Coast of North America and continue to build a unique time-series of carbon and hydrographic measurements in areas expected to be highly impacted by ocean acidification. 

British Columbia to southern California: making headway with ocean change Read More »

Libby Jewett, Director of NOAA's Ocean Acidification Program, holds two lobsters with the title of the story superimposed.

10 years in the making: An inside look at NOAA’s Ocean Acidification Program with Director Libby Jewett

Libby Jewett, Ph.D., Director of the NOAA Ocean Acidification Program, provides insight into ocean acidification. Jewett highlights how she became involved in ocean acidification work, how NOAA’s Ocean Acidification Program (OAP) started, and how we all can personally contribute to combatting this threat to our ocean.

10 years in the making: An inside look at NOAA’s Ocean Acidification Program with Director Libby Jewett Read More »

Scientists, scallop industry team up to study ocean acidification impacts

Guided by input from fishers, a team of scientists will bring together computer modeling and experiments to inform management policies for Northeast scallop fisheries facing the threat of ocean acidification.
Researchers from the University of Connecticut, NOAA’s Northeast Fisheries Science Center (NEFSC), Commercial Fisheries Research Foundation (CFRF), and Rutgers University will work together to study this economically and culturally significant resource for coastal communities in New England, with support from NOAA’s Ocean Acidification Program. Worth more than $500 million per year, scallops are the second most valuable fishery in the Northeast and are particularly vulnerable to ocean acidification.

Scientists, scallop industry team up to study ocean acidification impacts Read More »

Assessing Vulnerability to a Changing Ocean: Investigating impact and option for adaptation

In certain areas of the US, marine resources and the communities that depend on them are particularly vulnerable to the impacts of ocean and coastal acidification along with other ocean changes. The NOAA Ocean Acidification Program recently awarded funding for three regional vulnerability assessment projects in the Chesapeake Bay, Northeast US and US West Coast. The projects bring together oceanographic, fisheries and aquaculture data and social science to assess vulnerability of dependent communities and industries, anticipate challenges they may face, and explore adaptations options.

Assessing Vulnerability to a Changing Ocean: Investigating impact and option for adaptation Read More »

Ocean Acidification: Building on a Foundation at the Flower Garden Banks Sanctuary

Looking up at high-rise buildings, towering cathedrals, or the great pyramids at Giza; the feats of man seem unimaginable. The key to these massive architectural achievements is laying a quality foundation. Dr. Xinping Hu, an associate professor at Texas A&M Corpus Christi University, knows that a solid foundation is very important in science as well. Together with his co-investigators at NOAA’s Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Lab (AOML), Texas A&M University, and Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi, Dr. Hu will be building upon a foundation of data collected both at and near the Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary (NMS) in the northwestern Gulf of Mexico to better characterize the changes in ocean chemistry over space and time in these waters.
There are many facets to a strong structure, architectural or scientific. Having the right tools and site to build, along with a skilled team of craftsmen, and an insightful foreman are all integral to conduct impactful science.

Ocean Acidification: Building on a Foundation at the Flower Garden Banks Sanctuary Read More »

Optimizing Acidification Observations In A Changing Ocean

There are hundreds if not thousands of eyes on our changing ocean at any moment: Buoys, gliders, saildrones and ships measure carbonate chemistry and new ocean observing technologies are continually being created to monitor ocean acidification. As science and technology progress it is important to ensure that the most up to date knowledge is applied to the task at hand. NOAA’s Ocean Acidification Program (OAP) is teaming up with the U.S. Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS®) to fund four projects aimed at improving the observing system design for characterizing ocean acidification. This work will evaluate the capability of existing observations to characterize the magnitude and extent of acidification and explore alternative regional ocean acidification observing approaches. Ultimately this work will minimize errors in measurements, better integrate existing observations, and minimize costs of monitoring ocean acidification.
Learn more about this exciting work here!

Optimizing Acidification Observations In A Changing Ocean Read More »

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ADAPTING TO OCEAN ACIDIFICATION

The NOAA Ocean Acidification Program (OAP) works to prepare society to adapt to the consequences of ocean acidification and conserve marine ecosystems as acidification occurs. Learn more about the human connections and adaptation strategies from these efforts.

Adaptation approaches fostered by the OAP include:

FORECASTING

Using models and research to understand the sensitivity of organisms and ecosystems to ocean acidification to make predictions about the future, allowing communities and industries to prepare

MANAGEMENT

Using these models and predictions as tools to facilitate management strategies that will protect marine resources and communities from future changes

TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT

Developing innovative tools to help monitor ocean acidification and mitigate changing ocean chemistry locally

REDUCING OUR CARBON FOOTPRINT

On the Road

Drive fuel-efficient vehicles or choose public transportation. Choose your bike or walk! Don't sit idle for more than 30 seconds. Keep your tires properly inflated.

With your Food Choices

Eat local- this helps cut down on production and transport! Reduce your meat and dairy. Compost to avoid food waste ending up in the landfill

With your Food Choices

Make energy-efficient choices for your appliances and lighting. Heat and cool efficiently! Change your air filters and program your thermostat, seal and insulate your home, and support clean energy sources

By Reducing Coastal Acidification

Reduce your use of fertilizers, Improve sewage treatment and run off, and Protect and restore coastal habitats

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TAKE ACTION WITH YOUR COMMUNITY

You've taken the first step to learn more about ocean acidification - why not spread this knowledge to your community?

Every community has their unique culture, economy and ecology and what’s at stake from ocean acidification may be different depending on where you live.  As a community member, you can take a larger role in educating the public about ocean acidification. Creating awareness is the first step to taking action.  As communities gain traction, neighboring regions that share marine resources can build larger coalitions to address ocean acidification.  Here are some ideas to get started:

  1. Work with informal educators, such as aquarium outreach programs and local non-profits, to teach the public about ocean acidification. Visit our Education & Outreach page to find the newest tools!
  2. Participate in habitat restoration efforts to restore habitats that help mitigate the effects of coastal acidification
  3. Facilitate conversations with local businesses that might be affected by ocean acidification, building a plan for the future.
  4. Partner with local community efforts to mitigate the driver behind ocean acidification  – excess CO2 – such as community supported agriculture, bike & car shares and other public transportation options.
  5. Contact your regional Coastal Acidification Network (CAN) to learn how OA is affecting your region and more ideas about how you can get involved in your community
       More for Taking Community Action